Dynamic Data Masking keeps playing…keep your hands off my data!

As promised, I have been playing with Dynamic Data Masking and here are some things I have learned.  I downloaded World Wide Importers so I would have a place to play and there were masked columns already included.

This query will show us what has already been masked:

SELECT mc.name, t.name as table_name, mc.is_masked, mc.masking_function
FROM sys.masked_columns AS mc
JOIN sys.tables AS t
 ON mc.[object_id] = t.[object_id]
WHERE is_masked = 1;

Here we can see the column and the table that is being masked and what masking function is being used.

masking 1

This is a great time to talk about the different masking functions and what they do.  The four types in 2016 are Default, Email, Random and Custom String.

Default – For numeric and binary it will show a “0” For a date it will show 01/01/1900 and for strings it will show xxxx’s (more or less depending on the size of the field).

Email – It will expose the first letter of the email address and the suffix at the end of the email (.com, .net, .edu etc.) For example Batgirl@DC.com  would now be bxxx@xxxx.com.

Random – Number randomly generated between a set range. Kind of like the game, “Pick a number between 1 and 10” but for SQL.

Custom String – Lets you get creative with how much you show or cover and what you use to cover (not stuck with just xxxx’s).

Now for fun, let’s create a table that will be masked.

CREATE TABLE SuperHero
(HeroId INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY
,HeroName VARCHAR(100)
,RealName VARCHAR(100) MASKED WITH (FUNCTION = 'partial(1,"XXXXXXX",0)') NULL
,HeroEmail VARCHAR(100) MASKED WITH (FUNCTION = 'email()') NULL
,PhoneNumber VARCHAR(10) MASKED WITH (FUNCTION = 'default()') NULL);

Let’s add some data that we will want to mask:

INSERT SuperHero (HeroName, RealName, HeroEmail, PhoneNumber) VALUES
('Batman', 'Bruce Wayne', 'batsy@heros.com', '5558675309' ),
('Superman', 'Clark Kent', 'manofsteel@heros.com','5558675308' ),
('Spiderman', 'Peter Parker', 'spidey@heros.com','5558675307' );

SELECT * FROM SuperHero;

and finally we add some low level permissions of people who will look at the masked version of the data:

CREATE USER CommonPeople WITHOUT LOGIN; 
GRANT SELECT ON SuperHero TO CommonPeople; 

Now the test to see if CommonPeople have access to see all of our Superhero secrets:

EXECUTE AS USER = 'CommonPeople';
SELECT * FROM SuperHero; 
REVERT;

Try it out and see for yourself how it looks. Now you have experienced Dynamic Data Masking 101 in SQL Server 2016!

The song for this post is Good Charlotte – Keep Your Hands Off My Girl

All the Masking in the World Can Maybe Cover Your Dirty Laundry….

I have spent the last week learning about new features in SQL Server 2016 and one that I want to play with is Dynamic Data Masking (DDM).

What is data masking? It is a way to change or hide sensitive data. If I want to hide an email address that is Batgirl@DC.com,  I could either change it to be Batwoman@Heros.com using a masking software or I could use DDM to cover it like this BXXXXX@XXXXXX.com. I can also determine how many letters I want to cover with the masking in DDM.

If you want to permanently mask it for security purposes and force it to never link back to your production data, SQL Server Dynamic Data Masking (DDM) is not for you.  The built-in feature only applies a mask over the top, it doesn’t actually change the data that is stored in the database.   Think of SQL Servers’ version of data masking like a Halloween mask that sits on your face as opposed to plastic surgery that will forever change the way you look.

SQL Servers’ DDM will mask data to users that you set up to see the mask.  This is helpful for reporting or for curious people who want to look at data they shouldn’t be viewing.  It will not hide the data from privileged users.  It will not protect your data from someone taking a backup and restoring it somewhere else (If you want that, try Alway Encrypted instead). As a side note, DDM and Alway Encrypted won’t work together on the same column.

Now let’s get ready to play with Dynamic Data Masking in SQL Server.  (Coming next month)

Today’s song is Dirty Laundry by Carrie Underwood.

Mayday this is an emergency, my linked server is using ODBC to connect to an AG…

Availability Groups (AG) and Linked servers can get really tricky. Especially if you are dealing with multi-subnet failover.  The only way we have figured out how to do this is with ODBC. Here is how.

First, we have create an ODBC connection on our SQL Server.  The single server in the picture below is the server we are going create the ODBC connection and the linked server on.  It will go over to the AG Listener. ag-pic

First we are creating an ODBC Connection on our server that is going to link to the AG.

odbc1

Make sure to be in the System DSN section. Click Add

odbc2

We can pick either ODBC Driver 11 or 13.  This is a separate driver install that we can get here.  We want to install the driver and then we will see it as an option in the screen above.  Click Finish.

odbc3

Give it whatever name and description wanted, but save the name for later. The server should be the name of the AG Listener. Click Next.

odbc4

Technically we don’t have to put in a login and password, but I like to test the login and password that I am going to use for the linked server. It won’t be saved here. Click Next.

odbc5

Here is the magic part, make sure to check multi-subnet failover.  That is what is going to make the connection automatically fail between the two nodes. Click next, test the connection and then Finish. The ODBC connection is ready to be used by the linked server connection.  Let’s build that part now.

Go into SQL Server Management Studio and under Server Objects, right click on Linked Servers and select “New Linked Server”.

odbc6

The provider needs to be OLE DB Provider for ODBC Drivers. Remember the name we gave the ODBC connection?  We are going to use that here. Then go to the Security Tab.

odbc7

This is where we put in the login and it will be stored here.  I also make sure this user name and password is on both Nodes of the AG with the permissions that I need. Click Server Options

odbc8

The above is what I need, but I check that I am only giving access to what is needed and not more.  When we click ok, it will test our connection.  If everything works with no errors, we are ready to go.

Some of the problems that we have noticed are querying tables that have big datatypes like time(3-7), timestamp, and a few others.  Casting or converting the datatypes doesn’t help. If we pull the table into a view without the big datatype columns, we are able to query the view from another server, but never the base table. It has been a bit frustrating, but we are still hopeful that we can find a solution or that Microsoft with fix ODBC connections. If there is a better way to do this, please reach out to me.  We have things we need to solve and could use some help.

The song for this post is Mayday by Cam.

Coming soon: Count down to PASS Summit 2016 with more pictures from PASS Summit 2015. Watch twitter and the Magic Mirrors page for more.

I can make your logs clap…

The SQL error log has this nasty habit of getting big when I am not looking.  There are only two ways to keep is at a normal size. One is to stop and start your SQL instance (Reboot, Restart, Stop and Start) and the other is to run this handy little script:


EXEC sp_cycle_errorlog;

This will end the current log and start a new one.  Why does this matter?  The SQL Error log holds information about your backups, failed logins, SQL errors, edition information and other fun stuff.  The bigger it is, the longer it will take SQL to load it into memory so that you can read it.  Usually when you need to read it, you are in trouble so the slower it is, the more stressed you will be.

What is a good size?  I usually try to get it to roll over around 10 MB.  I use a monitoring tool and when the large error log alert is triggered, I have it run sp_cycle_errorlog for me so mine always stay a healthy size.  You don’t need fancy tools to do this though.  If you know about how fast your logs grow, you can set up a SQL Agent job to run it on a schedule to keep your logs healthy.

How many logs should I keep? This is completely up to you, but since I keep my logs so small, I try to keep 15 of them.  Why so many? I do it so I can go back and see issues further back if needed. You can adjust the amount you keep by right clicking on SQL Server Logs in SSMS and selecting “Configure”

Configure SQL Error Logs

Super cool, but what about the Agent error logs? There is a script for them as well!


USE msdb;
GO
EXEC sp_cycle_agent_errorlog;

See? Healthy and Happy Logs! Your Logs will be clapping with joy.

Takes as Long as it Takes SQL, Break on Me, I have a DAC…

The DAC, what is it? It is the Dedicated Administrator Console. Basically it is a way to connect to your SQL Server when all the other connections are tied up. But it takes a little bit of pre-planning so that you can use it when things go bad with your SQL Server.  Let’s enable it so you can test using it and know that it is there in the future.


EXEC sp_configure 'remote admin connections', 1;
GO
RECONFIGURE
GO

I was always afraid to use the DAC because I thought I had to use the command line and I am terrible with cmd. But did you know, you can connect to it through Management Studio? Now I can feel right at home when I trouble shoot a sick server.  To connect to a server using the DAC put “admin:” in front of the name of the server like this:

DAC

I use my elevated windows login for this point, but you can use what ever sys admin account that you have.

There are a few words of caution. You can only have one connection to your DAC on each server at a time. So don’t try to connect Object explorer to it. I have SQLPrompt and noticed that my server would send an alert on Severity Error 20 because SQL Prompt was trying to connect at the same time and was failing. Just be aware that you might get an error, but if everything is correct you can look down at the connection at the bottom of the query window and see you are connected.  If someone else is using the DAC, you won’t be able to use the connection, so it is a good idea to always close it when you are done.

Kendra Little b|t has a fantastic post for Brent Ozar Unlimited about the DAC and most importantly to me, how to tell who is connected.  This is the code that she wrote to help identify who is connected:


SELECT
CASE
WHEN ses.session_id= @@SPID THEN 'It''s me! '
ELSE '' END
+ coalesce(ses.login_name,'???') as WhosGotTheDAC,
ses.session_id,
ses.login_time,
ses.status,
ses.original_login_name
from sys.endpoints as en
join sys.dm_exec_sessions ses on
en.endpoint_id=ses.endpoint_id
where en.name='Dedicated Admin Connection'

Now when SQL Server Breaks on you, there is a tool that prevents us from shattering like glass.

If Crazy = Genius, I’m rebuilding one partition at a time!

We have had an index job that has been failing for a while.  This is one of those things you really don’t want to clean up because no one is complaining, but you know you should.  I had heard that I could rebuild one partition at a time, but where to start?  Today, I worked my way through it, so here it is so that you can do it too.

First you need to find the biggest indexes, there is a good chance those are the ones that live on partitions. I am removing Primary Keys.


SELECT i.[name] AS IndexName
,SUM(ps.[used_page_count]) * 8 AS IndexSizeKB
FROM sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND ps.[index_id] = i.[index_id]
WHERE i.name NOT LIKE 'PK%'
GROUP BY i.[name]
ORDER BY IndexSizeKB DESC

The top ones are most likely the ones you want to focus on.  Next, we need to track down the partition function.


SELECT * FROM sys.partition_functions

Next we are going to figure out which partition we want to rebuild.


SELECT sprv.value AS [Value], sprv.boundary_id AS [ID]
FROM sys.partition_functions AS spf
INNER JOIN sys.partition_range_values sprv ON sprv.function_id = spf.function_id
WHERE (spf.name = N'NameOfFunctionFromPartitionFunctions')
ORDER BY [ID] ASC

Pick the number of the partition you want to rebuild.

Next use your index name from earlier.  You will also need the table name and the partition number.


ALTER INDEX [IndexName]
ON [dbo].[TableName]
REBUILD PARTITION = 3

This will rebuild just the partition that you requested.