Starting now, is the wrong date for insert…

This is part 2 of my log-shipping journey, if you missed part 1, you can find it here.

I collected all of the file names I need, but you will notice I left the dates off. When my files are moved from one domain to another, their created dates are being changed. I needed the real dates for the correct restore order and to match the backups to the logs. If I were a Dark Knight Powershell master, I am sure I would have figured out how to do it. Every time I started to get close, I would would have a production issue or another distraction that needed my time. In the end I landed in my happy place, so we are fixing the dates in the database!

How do I get the right date for a file when the created date is being changed after it has moved? I was super lucky that the date is being stored in the filename too! (Huge thank you to Ola for his awesome database maintenance solution.)

An example of my filename is this:

Batcentral$Alfred_Batman_LOG_20210610_224501.trn

This is how I dissect the filename to get the date and time from it:

  UPDATE [DBAStuff].[dbo].[LogshippingFile]
  SET CreatedDate = CAST(Substring(FileName, (LEN(FileName)-18),8)  +' '+ (Substring(FileName, (LEN(FileName)-9),2)+ ':' + Substring(FileName, (LEN(FileName)-7),2) + ':' + Substring(FileName, (LEN(FileName)-5),2)) AS DATETIME)
  WHERE CreatedDate IS NULL

My filenames are different lengths which means the the dates won’t always be in the same place, instead I go to the end of the string and count backwards because my dates are always consistent. Then I add all the parts back together to get my datetime and update it into my table.

Are we done yet? Nope, there is more.

The song for this post is Toad the Wet Sprockets’ Starting Now

Load quick, got a list of files that need to be in a table…

Yes, I am trying to do a version of log-shipping that doesn’t require linking any servers and allows them to be in different domains. I also know I am crazy.

Now that we have that out of the way, let me show you some of the stuff I am doing! Loading a table from multiple file locations using Powershell. It will go and read what is in the directories and load them into a table for me (Oh my goodness, I knew Powershell was cool, but it took me so long to figure this out, that I was super proud with how fast it loaded).

First, the housekeeping. Create two tables in a DBA Database:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[LogshippingFile](
	[FileName] [varchar](500) NULL,
	[FileLocation] [varchar](1000) NULL,
	[FileType] [char](1) NULL,
	[Origin] [varchar](50) NULL,
	[ForDatabase] [varchar](50) NULL,
	[CreatedDate] [datetime2](7) NULL,
	[Applied] [bit] NOT NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[LogshippingFile] ADD  CONSTRAINT [DF_LogshippingFiles_Applied]  DEFAULT ((0)) FOR [Applied]
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Config](
	[Origin] [varchar](50) NULL,
	[FileLocation] [varchar](500) NULL,
	[Type] [char](1) NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]

In the Config table, I am going to put the common name for the database I am restoring so the rows will look like this:

OriginFileLocationType
Batman J:\FullBackups\Batman B
Batman J:\LogBackups\Batman L
Superman J:\FullBackups\Superman B
Superman J:\LogBackups\Superman L

Yay! Now we can get to the fun stuff. This is how I set up the Powershell:



# Credentials for connection to SQL Server. 
$username = 'Batgirl'
$password = '!Pennyworth54'
#Connecting to the SQL Server and Query to get FileLocation and Origin from the Config table. 
$DS = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance "BatCave01" -Database "DBAStuff" -Username $username -Password $password -Query "SELECT FileLocation, Origin FROM Config" -As DataSet

#Magic that puts my two columns into variables
$data = $DS.Tables[0].Rows
$data
ForEach ($Row in $data) {
$FileLocation = $Row.FileLocation 
$Origin = $Row.Origin



#Build my insert statement so Powershell knows what to expect. 
#gets all the filenames and loads them into the table. 
$sqlstatement=@'
INSERT INTO LogshippingFile
(
FileName,	
FileLocation, 
FileType,
Origin,
ForDatabase 
) 
VALUES (
	'{0}',
	'{1}',
	'{2}',
	'{3}',
	'{4}'

   
)
'@
Get-ChildItem -Recurse $FileLocation  | 
select Name,FullName, 
    @{
    Label='FileType'
    Expression={($FileLocation.Substring(10,1))}}, @{
    Label='Origin'
    Expression={($Origin)}}, @{
    Label='ForDatabase'
    Expression={'Gryphon_'+($Origin)}} |
   # @{Label="Length";Expression={$_.Length / 1024KB -as [int] }}  |
ForEach-Object {
          $SQL = $sqlstatement -f  $_.name,$_.FullName, $_.FileType, $_.Origin, $_.ForDatabase #,  $_.Length		
    Invoke-sqlcmd -Username $username -Password $password -Query $SQL -ServerInstance “BatCave01” -database “DBAStuff” -Querytimeout 0
    }
    }

Now we have all this data in the table, what do we do with it? Guess you will have to tune in again to this same Bat channel.

The song for this post is Matt Nathanson’s Kiss Quick