Lay your weary head to rest and run your query more…

Just coming from a wonderful week at PASS Summit. I sat in two separate sessions where this trick came up and watched as people furiously wrote it down.  Did you know that you can set a query to run multiple times in one command?  All you have to do is add “Go” and the number of times you want it to run.  For example:

SELECT GETDATE()
GO 5

Will return something like this:

go5results

Super cool, right?  It was mentioned in both Brent Ozar’s and Argenis Fernandez’s presentations and I didn’t want to forget. Now you can easily run your queries more and create load on your test system without having to click run over and over again.

Today’s post features Lyrics from Panic! At the Disco’s Cover of Carry On My Wayward Son

Listen to the AG that’s tricking you…

 

Another AG (Availability Group) Post? Yes, I learned something new and it must be cataloged. When you are failing AG’s back and forth really fast and a major indexing job kicks off in the middle, it can cause a transaction to have to rollback.  This rollback may take a REALLY long time, even if you were only on the node for 10 minutes and a large transaction had only been running for about 5 minutes. When I failed back to my preferred primary node and the AG Dashboard didn’t go completely green, I got worried.  Why in the world would it not go green? I just failed to the preferred secondary and applied a patch (see? I learned.) and then was failing back. It had been green when I started, green when I failed over to the secondary and now one of my biggest databases was not synchronizing on the primary….*sigh*

I panicked. In this situation I would normally pull the database out of the AG and then re-add it.  I didn’t have that option because it is a HUGE database and didn’t have that much time and space to move it around. I knew a large transaction had kicked off (thank you alert email that I created to warn me about such things) but thought that surely the rollback would have cleared quickly.  That lead me to looking for rolling back transactions.

I ran this on the alarming secondary node:

SELECT R.session_id, R.command ,R.status, R.percent_complete
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests R
WHERE R.command IN ('killed/rollback','rollback')

To my surprise, there were no results.  Nothing was killed or rolling back; or was it? I ran the query again, but this time without the where clause.

SELECT R.session_id, R.command ,R.status, R.percent_complete
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests R

I saw one command listed as “UNKNOWN TOKEN” that had a percent complete at about 5%. That percent was rising. I theorized that this was my rolling back process and when it finished, my AG would be healthy again.  The system isn’t used overnight. We had started the maintenance in the late afternoon and it was the secondary node in trouble, so I had time to test my theory.  It was an agonizing 8 hours as I kept checking on the percent_complete all evening.  It finally completed and the AG went green.

My lesson learned: When my AG isn’t healthy and I have already resumed data movement, before I pull the database out of the AG,I need to check for processes that have a percent complete on the secondary node. Being patient is really hard but necessary with AG’s.

The song that goes with this post Listen to the Man.

Nothing can stop me, nothing holds me back from changing recovery mode and getting development on track…

Greetings and other salutations,

Today I found out that part of the development environment was in “Full Recovery Mode”.  This means that if someone isn’t taking log backups, their databases get huge, and it also means that the backups were much bigger than they should have been.  They don’t need point in time recovery in our development environment so we decided to move them to “Simple recovery”. This could have been a big all day job if I went through the GUI, but you know me, I found a way to script it out and thought I would share it. I am showing you how to do it on one server at a time:

Connect to your development server in the master database and run this query to see how many are in “Full Recovery”:

 SELECT name, recovery_model_desc
 FROM sys.databases
 WHERE recovery_model_desc = 'FULL'

When I ran it on one of my servers, there were 24 databases that needed to be adjusted. So I built this:

 SELECT 'ALTER DATABASE [' + name + '] SET RECOVERY SIMPLE ;'
 FROM sys.databases
 WHERE recovery_model_desc = 'Full'

Then I took the results from that query and copied it into a new window and ran it and just like that, all my databases are now in “Simple Mode” in Development. I ran the first query one more time to make sure everything updated as expected.

It is a beautiful thing. I hope this helps you clean up development too!

The song from this post is from the Kongo’s Take it from Me

I can make your logs clap…

The SQL error log has this nasty habit of getting big when I am not looking.  There are only two ways to keep is at a normal size. One is to stop and start your SQL instance (Reboot, Restart, Stop and Start) and the other is to run this handy little script:


EXEC sp_cycle_errorlog;

This will end the current log and start a new one.  Why does this matter?  The SQL Error log holds information about your backups, failed logins, SQL errors, edition information and other fun stuff.  The bigger it is, the longer it will take SQL to load it into memory so that you can read it.  Usually when you need to read it, you are in trouble so the slower it is, the more stressed you will be.

What is a good size?  I usually try to get it to roll over around 10 MB.  I use a monitoring tool and when the large error log alert is triggered, I have it run sp_cycle_errorlog for me so mine always stay a healthy size.  You don’t need fancy tools to do this though.  If you know about how fast your logs grow, you can set up a SQL Agent job to run it on a schedule to keep your logs healthy.

How many logs should I keep? This is completely up to you, but since I keep my logs so small, I try to keep 15 of them.  Why so many? I do it so I can go back and see issues further back if needed. You can adjust the amount you keep by right clicking on SQL Server Logs in SSMS and selecting “Configure”

Configure SQL Error Logs

Super cool, but what about the Agent error logs? There is a script for them as well!


USE msdb;
GO
EXEC sp_cycle_agent_errorlog;

See? Healthy and Happy Logs! Your Logs will be clapping with joy.

If Crazy = Genius, I’m rebuilding one partition at a time!

We have had an index job that has been failing for a while.  This is one of those things you really don’t want to clean up because no one is complaining, but you know you should.  I had heard that I could rebuild one partition at a time, but where to start?  Today, I worked my way through it, so here it is so that you can do it too.

First you need to find the biggest indexes, there is a good chance those are the ones that live on partitions. I am removing Primary Keys.


SELECT i.[name] AS IndexName
,SUM(ps.[used_page_count]) * 8 AS IndexSizeKB
FROM sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS ps
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i ON ps.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND ps.[index_id] = i.[index_id]
WHERE i.name NOT LIKE 'PK%'
GROUP BY i.[name]
ORDER BY IndexSizeKB DESC

The top ones are most likely the ones you want to focus on.  Next, we need to track down the partition function.


SELECT * FROM sys.partition_functions

Next we are going to figure out which partition we want to rebuild.


SELECT sprv.value AS [Value], sprv.boundary_id AS [ID]
FROM sys.partition_functions AS spf
INNER JOIN sys.partition_range_values sprv ON sprv.function_id = spf.function_id
WHERE (spf.name = N'NameOfFunctionFromPartitionFunctions')
ORDER BY [ID] ASC

Pick the number of the partition you want to rebuild.

Next use your index name from earlier.  You will also need the table name and the partition number.


ALTER INDEX [IndexName]
ON [dbo].[TableName]
REBUILD PARTITION = 3

This will rebuild just the partition that you requested.

Strip it down and remove the bad query plan

Today I got to play with some really bad queries. But the queries weren’t necessarily bad, it was more they had bad plans. I thought I had already blogged about it and tried to find my code. Alas, it wasn’t there so let’s strip it down on how you would remove a bad query plan. I am leaving out the trouble shooting part of how to determine if it is a bad plan because so much of it “depends”.
First you have to find the bad query plan.  Get a unique line from your query and paste it in the query below.

USE master;
GO

SELECT usecounts, cacheobjtype, objtype, text, plan_handle
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle)
WHERE usecounts > 1
AND TEXT LIKE '%Unique part of query%' --put the unique part of the query here.
ORDER BY usecounts DESC;

Now, copy the plan handle and paste it over the plan handle that I have listed here:

SELECT * FROM sys.dm_exec_query_plan (0x060001004DE4D526F0BEA28F05000);

If you click on the query_plan link, you can see what the plan looks like.  After you have reviewed it and determined the plan is bad then you can paste your plan handle over the one below to remove it from the proc cache.

DBCC FREEPROCCACHE (0x060001004DE4D526F0BEA28F05000)

There you have it. Best of luck with your bad plans.

For one good, naughty little girl found a diamond…Object Explorer Details

It’s Christmas time again and time to listen to my FAVORITE Christmas song called Joel The Lump of Coal.
Just before Thanksgiving we had our SQLSaturday\Big Mountain Data event and I spoke! This is my third time speaking at this event and every year I regret speaking and feel like everyone would have been better in another session, every year that is until this one! I loved my session and I will actually be submitting it to PASS Summit this year. Keep your fingers crossed with me. It was on SQL Server Management Studio Tips and Tricks.

One of the tips that I was super surprised that many people didn’t know is the Object Explorer Details. It allows you to delete multiple objects at once, script out multiple objects at once and just do some really cool stuff. How do I access this magic you are asking? When in management studio, click on View>>Object Explorer Details.

 

ObjectExplorerDetails

Now you can have a diamond that will help you too!