In the music the moment you own it and can decode your database!

Yesterday I had the awesome opportunity to present at Big Mountain Data and SQL Saturday Salt Lake City.  I was super nervous, but I think it went well over all.  Huge thank you to the kind friends that sat in the audience to help build my confidence and for everyone that attended.  Here are the scripts that I promised to post.  If you would like the slide deck, it is posted on the Utah Geek Events website here: http://www.utahgeekevents.com/Downloads

The first script is the one that gets the row counts on each table so you can see what tables you want to look at and what tables you want to skip.

 
-- Shows all user tables and row counts for the current database
-- Remove is_ms_shipped = 0 check to include system objects
-- i.index_id < 2 indicates clustered index (1) or hash table (0)
SELECT o.name,
ddps.row_count
FROM sys.indexes AS i
INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o ON i.OBJECT_ID = o.OBJECT_ID
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS ddps ON i.OBJECT_ID = ddps.OBJECT_ID
AND i.index_id = ddps.index_id
WHERE i.index_id = 2
AND o.is_ms_shipped = 0
ORDER BY ddps.row_count DESC

This next part is the second demo I did about digging through the database.

 
--What columns are in the Sales Tables?
SELECT A.name, B.name
FROM sys.tables A
INNER JOIN sys.columns B ON A.object_id = B.object_id
WHERE A.name LIKE '%Sales%'

--Column called "Order" something with amount?
SELECT A.name, B.name
FROM sys.tables A
INNER JOIN sys.columns B ON A.object_id = B.object_id
WHERE B.name LIKE '%Order%'

--OrderQty is the column I am looking for...
SELECT A.name, B.name
FROM sys.tables A
INNER JOIN sys.columns B ON A.object_id = B.object_id
WHERE B.name LIKE '%OrderQty%'

--How do I know for sure it is the table I want?
SELECT 
c.name 'Column Name',
t.Name 'Data type',
c.max_length 'Max Length',
c.precision ,
--c.scale ,
--c.is_nullable,
ISNULL(i.is_primary_key, 0) 'Primary Key'
FROM sys.columns c
INNER JOIN sys.types t ON c.user_type_id = t.user_type_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.index_columns ic ON ic.object_id = c.object_id AND ic.column_id = c.column_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.indexes i ON ic.object_id = i.object_id AND ic.index_id = i.index_id
WHERE c.object_id = OBJECT_ID('Sales.SalesOrderDetail')

This is the code from the third demo where I was looking for the foreign keys. I got this off stack overflow and it has been very helpful.

 
SELECT obj.name AS FK_NAME, sch.name AS [schema_name], tab1.name AS [table], col1.name AS [column], tab2.name AS [referenced_table], col2.name AS [referenced_column]
FROM sys.foreign_key_columns fkc
INNER JOIN sys.objects obj ON obj.object_id = fkc.constraint_object_id
INNER JOIN sys.tables tab1 ON tab1.object_id = fkc.parent_object_id
INNER JOIN sys.schemas sch ON tab1.schema_id = sch.schema_id
INNER JOIN sys.columns col1 ON col1.column_id = parent_column_id AND col1.object_id = tab1.object_id
INNER JOIN sys.tables tab2 ON tab2.object_id = fkc.referenced_object_id
INNER JOIN sys.columns col2 ON col2.column_id = referenced_column_id AND col2.object_id = tab2.object_id
WHERE tab1.name = 'SalesOrderDetail'

The other demos that I did were opening Views and stored procedures and a walk through of how to use the Database Diagram feature.

Hope you all had a wonderful time at the event like I did!

You’ve got to move it, move it!

I have been rushing all week trying to get new development environments upgraded to 2012 while leaving the old environments online. Everyone wants it done now and I wanted to share a few things that are making my job easier.
This first one is a script that makes copying logins across servers so easy. I found this online and feel terrible that I can’t properly accredit it to the person that wrote it. (If you wrote it, let me know and I will update this)

 

USE master
GO
IF OBJECT_ID (‘sp_hexadecimal’) IS NOT NULL
DROP PROCEDURE sp_hexadecimal
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_hexadecimal
@binvalue varbinary(256),
@hexvalue varchar (514) OUTPUT
AS
DECLARE @charvalue varchar (514)
DECLARE @i int
DECLARE @length int
DECLARE @hexstring char(16)
SELECT @charvalue = ‘0x’
SELECT @i = 1
SELECT @length = DATALENGTH (@binvalue)
SELECT @hexstring = ‘0123456789ABCDEF’
WHILE (@i <= @length)
BEGIN
DECLARE @tempint int
DECLARE @firstint int
DECLARE @secondint int
SELECT @tempint = CONVERT(int, SUBSTRING(@binvalue,@i,1))
SELECT @firstint = FLOOR(@tempint/16)
SELECT @secondint = @tempint – (@firstint*16)
SELECT @charvalue = @charvalue +
SUBSTRING(@hexstring, @firstint+1, 1) +
SUBSTRING(@hexstring, @secondint+1, 1)
SELECT @i = @i + 1
END

SELECT @hexvalue = @charvalue
GO

IF OBJECT_ID (‘sp_help_revlogin’) IS NOT NULL
DROP PROCEDURE sp_help_revlogin
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_help_revlogin @login_name sysname = NULL AS
DECLARE @name sysname
DECLARE @type varchar (1)
DECLARE @hasaccess int
DECLARE @denylogin int
DECLARE @is_disabled int
DECLARE @PWD_varbinary varbinary (256)
DECLARE @PWD_string varchar (514)
DECLARE @SID_varbinary varbinary (85)
DECLARE @SID_string varchar (514)
DECLARE @tmpstr varchar (1024)
DECLARE @is_policy_checked varchar (3)
DECLARE @is_expiration_checked varchar (3)

DECLARE @defaultdb sysname

IF (@login_name IS NULL)
DECLARE login_curs CURSOR FOR

SELECT p.sid, p.name, p.type, p.is_disabled, p.default_database_name, l.hasaccess, l.denylogin FROM
sys.server_principals p LEFT JOIN sys.syslogins l
ON ( l.name = p.name ) WHERE p.type IN ( ‘S’, ‘G’, ‘U’ ) AND p.name <> ‘sa’
ELSE
DECLARE login_curs CURSOR FOR
SELECT p.sid, p.name, p.type, p.is_disabled, p.default_database_name, l.hasaccess, l.denylogin FROM
sys.server_principals p LEFT JOIN sys.syslogins l
ON ( l.name = p.name ) WHERE p.type IN ( ‘S’, ‘G’, ‘U’ ) AND p.name = @login_name
OPEN login_curs

FETCH NEXT FROM login_curs INTO @SID_varbinary, @name, @type, @is_disabled, @defaultdb, @hasaccess, @denylogin
IF (@@fetch_status = -1)
BEGIN
PRINT ‘No login(s) found.’
CLOSE login_curs
DEALLOCATE login_curs
RETURN -1
END
SET @tmpstr = ‘/* sp_help_revlogin script ‘
PRINT @tmpstr
SET @tmpstr = ‘** Generated ‘ + CONVERT (varchar, GETDATE()) + ‘ on ‘ + @@SERVERNAME + ‘ */’
PRINT @tmpstr
PRINT ”
WHILE (@@fetch_status <> -1)
BEGIN
IF (@@fetch_status <> -2)
BEGIN
PRINT ”
SET @tmpstr = ‘– Login: ‘ + @name
PRINT @tmpstr
IF (@type IN ( ‘G’, ‘U’))
BEGIN — NT authenticated account/group

SET @tmpstr = ‘CREATE LOGIN ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name ) + ‘ FROM WINDOWS WITH DEFAULT_DATABASE = [‘ + @defaultdb + ‘]’
END
ELSE BEGIN — SQL Server authentication
— obtain password and sid
SET @PWD_varbinary = CAST( LOGINPROPERTY( @name, ‘PasswordHash’ ) AS varbinary (256) )
EXEC sp_hexadecimal @PWD_varbinary, @PWD_string OUT
EXEC sp_hexadecimal @SID_varbinary,@SID_string OUT

— obtain password policy state
SELECT @is_policy_checked = CASE is_policy_checked WHEN 1 THEN ‘ON’ WHEN 0 THEN ‘OFF’ ELSE NULL END FROM sys.sql_logins WHERE name = @name
SELECT @is_expiration_checked = CASE is_expiration_checked WHEN 1 THEN ‘ON’ WHEN 0 THEN ‘OFF’ ELSE NULL END FROM sys.sql_logins WHERE name = @name

SET @tmpstr = ‘CREATE LOGIN ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name ) + ‘ WITH PASSWORD = ‘ + @PWD_string + ‘ HASHED, SID = ‘ + @SID_string + ‘, DEFAULT_DATABASE = [‘ + @defaultdb + ‘]’

IF ( @is_policy_checked IS NOT NULL )
BEGIN
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘, CHECK_POLICY = ‘ + @is_policy_checked
END
IF ( @is_expiration_checked IS NOT NULL )
BEGIN
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘, CHECK_EXPIRATION = ‘ + @is_expiration_checked
END
END
IF (@denylogin = 1)
BEGIN — login is denied access
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘; DENY CONNECT SQL TO ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name )
END
ELSE IF (@hasaccess = 0)
BEGIN — login exists but does not have access
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘; REVOKE CONNECT SQL TO ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name )
END
IF (@is_disabled = 1)
BEGIN — login is disabled
SET @tmpstr = @tmpstr + ‘; ALTER LOGIN ‘ + QUOTENAME( @name ) + ‘ DISABLE’
END
PRINT @tmpstr
END

FETCH NEXT FROM login_curs INTO @SID_varbinary, @name, @type, @is_disabled, @defaultdb, @hasaccess, @denylogin
END
CLOSE login_curs
DEALLOCATE login_curs
RETURN 0
GO

EXEC sp_help_revlogin

 

This next one is awesome too. When you have copied a database to a new server and have SQL logins that you want to sync up really quick, this script is awesome. Run it on each database that has that login.

ALTER USER [LoginName]
WITH LOGIN = [LoginName]

I hope this will save you some time and helps you get to the ball too!

Have a magical day!